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These 3D-printed Switch adapters allow one-handed gamers to play Zelda

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The versatility of the Nintendo Switch and its Joy-Con controllers is one of the console’s greatest strengths. An engineer named Julio Vazquez has taken that idea even further to create a 3D-printed Joy-Con adapter that lets disabled gamers play with only one hand. The creation was first spotted by Eurogamer.

Vazquez developed the adapters for his friend Rami Wehbe, who lost the ability to control his right hand in a cerebrovascular accident, but still wanted to be able to play The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild. Vazquez ended up with two designs for the Joy-Con controllers. One resembles Nintendo’s Joy-Con grip, but it pushes the controller halves together to make it easy to reach across to the other side. It also adds two...

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mellangatang
1 day ago
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That looks awfully uncomfortable.
jayisgames
1 day ago
Try living without the use of a hand.

Nintendo Controller Poster

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Have you been a fan of Nintendo since the beginning? Are you a video game collector? If so, you’ll love this poster. It’s printed on 100lb high quality paper and hand made to order. If you want to liven up your office or game room, this should do the trick.

Get it on Amazon for $24.99

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Buy Now

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mellangatang
28 days ago
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Where's the original controller?

Chicago’s new Apple store has a giant MacBook for a roof

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Construction is underway at the new Apple store in downtown Chicago, and today, as reported by DNA Chicago, a new design element was added — a giant Apple logo. A construction crew laid out the logo on the store’s silver, rectangular roof, making it look like a giant MacBook. It stayed for less than an hour before crews rolled up the logo and removed it.

Designed by London-based Foster+Partners, the store is a relocation of Apple’s original Chicago flagship and is a 20,000-square-foot space which, upon completion, will have all-glass walls and a thin, carbon fiber roof... that looks like a MacBook.

The first renderings were originally unveiled in 2015, and touted the project’s “echo” to Prairie Style homes. As the Chicago Tribune...

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mellangatang
56 days ago
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Umm... this might be the moment Apple has jumped the shark.

Amazon granted a patent that prevents in-store shoppers from online price checking

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Amazon’s long been a go-to for people to online price compare while shopping at brick-and-mortars. Now, a new patent granted to the company could prevent people from doing just that inside Amazon’s own stores.

The patent, titled “Physical Store Online Shopping Control,” details a mechanism where a retailer can intercept network requests like URLs and search terms that happen on its in-store Wi-Fi, then act upon them in various ways.

The document details in great length how a retailer like Amazon would use this information to its benefit. If, for example, the retailer sees you’re trying to access a competitor’s website to price check an item, it could compare the requested content to what’s offered in-store and then send price comparison...

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mellangatang
63 days ago
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Fuck you, Bezos.
Talez
63 days ago
It's a defensive patent. If any retailer tries to stop people from checking prices on Amazon on the in-store Wifi they can sue them on behalf of the customers.

Fashionable Friday: What’s Cookin’?

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With it being graduation season, Father’s Day and kids heading off to college and their first apartments, I thought it might be fun to well-appoint the kitchen this week. I’ve included my absolute go-to cookbook, The Better Homes & Gardens New Cookbook. Even if you’re an experienced cook, this is a great reference for those staple recipes or the young cook or baker in your life. From exactly how long to cook vegetables to standard recipes for gravy, soups, and salad dressings, this book has all the basics without having to scroll endlessly through the internet. I told my pals I was including it and they all admitted to having it and dog-earing certain recipes. “Did you know it has how to carve a turkey in it?” a certain regular contributor to this very blog sagely told me yesterday. I’m putting an Inkaren Memo Clip on THAT page.

The Lamy Logo Multicolor Ballpoint pen take standard D1 refills like its more expensive cousin, the 2000 multipen, but for a fraction of the cost. It’s also stainless steel which means its kitchen-friendly material. In the kitchen, a good ballpoint or gel pen to annotate recipe cards is essential. I also strongly recommend having a pencil, a mechanical pencil or multi-function pen/pencil makes it easy to have a sharp point handy at all times. The Zebra Sharbo-X is a great candidate here in that it is customizable with three components and features a metal body. I always keep my Sharbo filled with a mechanical pencil, a gel pen and a needlepoint ballpoint for writing on waxy paper surfaces like magazines and filling out forms. Zebra refills are top notch and will accept standard D1 in a pinch.

If you want to keep a fountain pen in the kitchen, I’d recommend a Pilot Vanishing Point or a Decimo. This is a place where you will most likely be writing notes, recipes, grocery lists and other short items rather than longer writing. Not having to cap and uncap it would speed up use and the extra fine nibs of the Pilot line would be beneficial on the somewhat lesser quality papers you could find yourself writing upon.

The classic Rifle Paper recipe box is the perfect size to fill your family’s favorite recipes, new and old. Exacompta Index Cards which are very fountain pen-friendly will fit perfectly into the recipe box and is a great option to continue to add recipes to the box or you can purchase additional recipe cards from Rifle.

Finally, don’t stop with just that one dishtowel from Easy, Tiger. I pretty own all of them now. Really. I’m not just saying that because I want them to like me. But they do work in my same zip code.

  • Zebra Sharbo X LT3 Multi Pen Body Component in Silver $32.50 (via JetPens)
  • EDK Pen, starting at $60 (via Karas Pen Co.)
  • Inkaren Memo Clips Box of 30 $5.50 (via Fresh Stock Japan)
  • L’Artisan Pastellier Callifolio Bleu Equinoxe 5 Fountain Pen Ink (40 ml Bottle) $12 (via JetPens)
  • Better Homes & Gardens New Cookbook, 16th Edition $20.07 Hardcover, Ringbound (via Amazon)
  • Polka Dot Recipe Box & Card Set (include 12 letterpress printed dividers and 24 spoon recipe cards) $34 (via Rifle Paper Co.)
  • Boys to the Yard Dishtowel $15 (via Easy Tiger)
  • Triangle Colored Pencil Set $14.95 (via Sapori)
  • Latte Bowls (set of four) in Tourmaline $24 (via Anthropologie)
  • Newgate Wall Clock – Brixton $108 Special Price (via West Elm)
  • Lamy Logo Multicolor Ballpoint Pen $32 (via Pen Chalet)
  • Pilot Vanishing Point Decimo Fountain Pen in Burgundy, Fine Nib $140 (via Anderson Pens)
  • Four-Colour Ballpoint Pen by Hightide £11.50 (via The Stationer)
  • Wooden Utensils Fork Spoon Knife (Set of 20) $3.50 per set (via CuteTape)
  • Exacompta Record Index Cards in Graph (4″ x 6″) 100 Cards, $14.95 per pack (via JetPens)

Thanks to my sponsors for providing some of the images I use for Fashionable Friday. Please consider making your next purchase from one of the shops that support this blog and let them know you heard about them here. Thanks for your support and for supporting the shops that help keep it running.

There’s some discount codes to be used this week so don’t forget to check some of those out… The Stationer is having a sale right now and Pen Chalet has an extra coupon code that expires today in the header bar… look up!

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mellangatang
67 days ago
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The Callifolio Bleu is just lovely.

My social media fast

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Last week (approx. May 7-14), I stopped using social media for an entire week. I logged out of all the sites and deleted the apps from my phone. I didn’t so much as peek at Instagram, which is, with Twitter and old-school Flickr, probably my favorite online service of all time. I used Twitter as minimally as I could, for work only.1 I didn’t check in anywhere on Swarm. No Facebook. As much as I could, I didn’t use my phone. I left it at home when I went to the grocery store. I didn’t play any games on it. I left it across the room when I went to bed and when I worked.

Many people have given up social media and written about it — the digital equivalent of the “Why I’m Leaving New York” essay — but since I didn’t write about leaving New York, I’m going to do this instead.

I used to be very good about using my phone and social media appropriately. More than a decade of working on kottke.org taught me how to not be online when I wasn’t working (for the most part). I tried super hard not to use my phone at all around my kids and if I was out with friends, my phone stayed in my pocket.2

Almost a year ago, after 13+ years in the city, I moved from lower Manhattan3 to rural Vermont. It’s beautiful here. I live in a house in the country surrounded by horse pasture and there’s great skiing in the winter. The nearest town is only five minutes away by car; it has a two-screen movie theater, a handful of restaurants (none of which are typically open after 10pm), two grocery stores, but nowhere to get a proper donut, sushi, or bowl of ramen. (The nearest ramen is an hour’s drive away.) While I was writing this post yesterday afternoon, the power in my house went out and didn’t come back on for three hours, forcing a delay in publication. It’s been difficult to meet people. Folks here are nice, but they mostly remind me of the people in the small town I grew up in (aka why I moved to the city in the first place). I work from home at a desk in my bedroom and some days, the only beings I’ll talk to are Siri, my landlord’s horses, and some days, my kids and their mom.

Social media, mostly through my phone, has been an important way for me to stay connected with friends and goings on in the wider world. But lately I’d noticed an obsessiveness, an addiction really, that I didn’t like once I became fully aware of it. When I wasn’t working, I was on my phone, refreshing Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook repeatedly in an endless series, like a little old lady at Caesar’s Palace working several slot machines at the same time. And I couldn’t stop it — my phone was in my hand even when I was trying to concentrate on my kids, watching a movie, or reading a book. So, I quit for a week to see what would happen. It’s not a super-long time period, but here’s what I noticed:

- Once I’d set my mind to it, it was pretty easy to go cold turkey. Perhaps my Twitter usage and keeping up with the news for kottke.org acted as a nicotine patch, but I don’t think so. Instagram was the toughest to stay away from, but I didn’t crack once.

- As the week went on, it was more and more evident that it wasn’t so much social media as the phone that was the problem. Even now, a few days after the conclusion of my experiment, I’m leaving my phone at home when I go out or across the room when I’m doing something. I’m going to try hard to keep this up.

- Buuuut, when you have kids, there is no such thing as giving up your phone. There’s always the potential call from their school or their mom or their doctor or another parent regarding a playdate or or or. I spend enough time online at my computer for work that I could mostly do without my phone, but with kids, that’s not really an option.

- Not a single person noticed that I had stopped using social media. (Not enough to tell me anyway.) Perhaps if it had been two weeks? For me, this reinforced that social media is actually not a good way to “stay connected with friends”. Social media aggregates interactions between loved ones so that you get industrialized communication rather than personal connection. No one really notices if a particular person goes missing because they’re just one interchangeable node in a network.

- My no-social week, for a variety of reasons, was probably the shittiest week I’d had in more than a year. Total emotional mess. Being off social media didn’t make it any better, but I doubt it made it worse. Overall, it was probably a good thing I wasn’t subjecting my friends and followers to self-subtweets and emo Instagram Stories…I was already scoring enough own goals without social media’s help.

- So, what did I do instead? I wish I could say that I had loads of extra free time that I used to learn Spanish, clean my house, catch up with old friends, cook delicious meals, and finish a couple work projects. Perhaps if shittiest week ever hadn’t been happening, I would have done some of that. Still, I did end up going to bed early every night, read a couple books, and had more time for work and dealing with kid drama.

After the week was up, I greedily checked in on Instagram and Facebook to see what I had missed. Nothing much, of course. Since then, I’ve been checking them a bit less. When I am on, I’ve been faving and commenting more in an attempt to be a little more active in connecting. I unfollowed some accounts I realized I didn’t care that much about and followed others I’ve been curious to check out. Swarm I check a lot less, about once a day — there was a lot of FOMO going on when I saw friends checked in at cool places in NYC or on vacations in Europe. And I’m only checking in when I go someplace novel, just to keep a log of where I’ve been…that’s always fun to look back on.

Mostly, I’ve resolved to use my phone less. Being on my phone was my fidget spinner…this thing that I would do when there was nothing else to do or that I would use to delay going to bed or delay getting out of bed in the morning. Going forward, I’m going to be more mindful about its use. If nothing else, my hands and thumbs might start feeling better.

  1. Yeah, I did not stop using Twitter. Ideally I would have, but Twitter is a huge source of information for this here website and I couldn’t afford to give it up without ditching work for a week, which I did not want to do because I wanted to maintain my normal schedule. But I didn’t look at Twitter on my phone, didn’t reply to or fave any tweets, muted some non-news/link accounts I follow, and limited my usage to “business hours”.

  1. Still one of my favorite tweets is from Scott Simpson: “My new standard of cool: when I’m hanging out with you, I never see your phone ever ever ever.”

  1. Haha, you’re getting a mini leaving NYC essay anyway. Suckers!

Tags: Facebook   Instagram   Jason Kottke   NYC   Swarm   Twitter   WWW
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deezil
90 days ago
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The way he talks about "the kids mom" and the crappy week... maybe he did well with the week away for other reasons.
Louisville, Kentucky
mellangatang
90 days ago
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Wow, a whole week?!?
Whup Tee Doo...

Nobody cares.
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